Volume 6, Issue 22                                                                                      August 21, 1998


Vegetables

Vegetable Insects - Joanne Whalen, Extension IPM Specialist; jwhalen@udel.edu

Cabbage.

Along with diamondback and cabbage looper larvae, begin to check fields for fall armyworm and beet armyworm larvae. A Bt plus a pyrethroid will work well to control a combination of diamondback and cabbage looper larvae. However, if populations of fall armyworm and beet armyworm increase, Spintor would be a better choice. Spintor should only be used for DBM and loopers when populations exceed the economic threshold level and it should be alternated with the BT insecticides to avoid the development of resistance.

Lima Beans.

With the recent increase in corn earworm moth flights and moth activity in fields, we should begin to see more corn earworm larvae in the next 7-day period. Fields should be checked twice a week for earworms, tarnished plant bugs and stinkbugs. Lannate will provide control of all 3 insects.

Peppers.

All peppers should be sprayed on a 7-10 day schedule for corn borer , fall armyworm and aphid control except in the Bridgeville area where sprays are needed on a 5-7 day schedule. Lannate or Orthene are the preferred materials at this time.

Snap Beans.

Processing snap beans should still be sprayed at the bud and pin stages with Orthene for corn borer control. With the recent increase in corn earworm moth flights, Asana will need to be combined with Orthene at the pin spray once trap catches increase to 20 moths per night. In most areas, a third spray with Lannate will be needed 5-7 days from harvest. In the Bridgeville area, sprays are needed on a 4-day schedule from the pin stage through harvest. Be sure to check the Crop Pest Hotline for the most recent trap catches in your area. Maintain a 7-day spray schedule on fresh market snap beans from pin through harvest.

Spinach.

As soon as plants emerge, begin scouting small plants for webworms and beet armyworm larvae. Controls should be applied when worms are small and before they have moved deep into the hearts of the plants. Since Lannate can not be applied before plants are 3-inches in diameter, Ambush, Pounce or a Bt insecticide should be used. Generally, at least 2 applications are needed to achieve control of webworms and beet armyworm.

Sweet Corn.

Fresh market silking sweet corn should be sprayed on a 3-day schedule throughout the state. If Ambush, Asana or Pounce are being used, you should combine the mid-range rate of these pyrethroids with Lannate or Larvin to control the complex of corn borers, earworms, and fall armyworm. If fall armyworm pressure is high in your area, you will need to alternate the high rate of Baythroid or Warrior with Lannate or Larvin at this time. *


Vegetable Diseases - Kate Everts, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Maryland and University of Delaware ; everts@udel.edu

MELCAST for Fungicide Application on Watermelons.

Do not use MELCAST if there is a disease outbreak in your field, it is a preventative program. Below are the EFI values from weather stations located on the Eastern Shore August 11-17. Any questions please call Phil Shields at (410) 742-8788 or e-mail: ps136@umail.umd.edu

EFI Values

Location

8/11/98

8/12/98

8/13/98

8/14/98

8/15/98

8/16/98

8/17/98

U of M, LESREC
Salisbury,MD

6

5

4

3

3

5

5

Wootten Farms, Galestown,MD

0

4

3

5

0

3

6

Mark Collins, Laurel, DE

0

5

3

4

3

5

7

U of D, REC Georgetown, DE

0

4

4

3

2

4

2

Vincent Farms Laurel, DE

0

4

4

2

3

4

6

Watermelon Fields should be sprayed with a fungicide when 30 EFI values have been accumulated by the weather station nearest your fields. Add 2 points for every overhead irrigation. After a fungicide spray, reset your counter to 0 and start over. If a spray has NOT been applied in 14 days, apply a fungicide and reset the counter to zero. The first and last day above can be partial days so use the larger EFI value of this report and other reports for any specific day. *


Field Crops

Field Crop Insects - Joanne Whalen, Extension IPM Specialist ; jwhalen@udel.edu

Soybeans.

With the recent increase in corn earworm moth flights, be sure to check soybeans, especially open-canopy fields, for earworm larvae. Low levels of larvae can be found in late-planted full-season beans and barley beans. Economic levels have just been reported on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. No controls will be needed until at least 1/3 of the population is inch long and the first signs of pod feeding are detected. The treatment threshold is 5 per 25 sweeps in wide row beans and 3 per 25 sweeps in narrow row beans. A pyrethroid or Larvin will provide control. *

Grain Marketing Highlights - Carl German, Extension Crops Marketing Specialist ; clgerman@udel.edu

Export Sales Provide Slight Support For Lackluster Grain Market

For the week ending August 13th, 1998 USDA reported corn export sales of 713,500 MT, soybeans at 392,900 MT, soybean meal at 147,500 MT, soybean oil at 50,700 MT, and wheat export sales of 321, 500 MT. The weekly amount reported for corn was slightly above the high side of forecast expectations, and may provide impetus for a slight rally. However, U.S. corn export sales are currently running well behind year ago levels. U.S. soybean exports are running nearly equal to year ago levels, with soybean meal and soyoil export sales running well ahead of last year.

As we await further news on new crop corn and soybean development, it becomes necessary to consider the potential impact that a large U.S. crop is likely to have on commodity prices. Many analysts believe that a U.S. corn crop of 9.6 billion bushels or better is likely to take December corn futures to the loan level, which is $1.89 per bushel nationally, and $2.10 per bushel in Delaware. The national loan rate will dictate the potential floor price for corn in Chicago.

A production forecast of 2.82 billion bushels for U.S. soybeans, a record high, and a more than doubling of the projected carryover from the 1997/98 to the 1998/99 marketing year is setting the stage for soybean prices to take a further plunge by harvest time. The national loan rate for soybeans is $5.26 per bushel, and $ 5.36 per bushel in Delaware.

Based upon the information that we currently have and expecting USDA's September production forecast to be increased for corn and soybeans, it does not appear that prices have bottomed out. For those needing to make necessary new crop sales any move of December corn to $2.25 and November soybeans to $5.60 per bushel should be considered. Of course, local basis offerings (currently even to 15 over for new crop corn, and 12 under to 21 under for new crop soybeans) need to be considered. *


Laurel Farmer's Auction Market Report

August 13 - August 19, 1998

Quantity Produce Price
24,396 Cantaloupes  
 

Athena

0.25-1.35
 

Super Star

0.25-1.10
 

Eclipse

1.55
 

Passport

0.50-0.65
1081 Honeydews 0.60-1.60
  Sunny Dews 0.60-0.75
390 Crenshaws 0.50-0.80
5417 Sugar Babies 0.35-1.35
  Seedless Sugar Babies 1.00-1.50
412,778 Watermelons  
 

Crimson Sweet

 
 

12 up

0.50-0.75
 

15 up

0.50-1.40
 

20 up

0.60-1.85
 

25 up

1.30-2.05
 

Sangria

 
 

12 up

0.40-0.75
 

15up

0.40-1.75
 

20 up

0.60-2.00
 

25 up

1.00-2.15
 

All Sweet

 
 

15 up

0.50-1.10
 

20 up

0.60-2.05
 

25 up

1.00-2.25
 

30 up

1.45
 

Jubiliee

 
 

15 up

1.00-1.10
 

20 up

1.15-2.25
 

Royal Star

 
 

15 up

0.50
 

20 up

0.70-0.75
 

25 up

1.85
 

Seedless

0.50-2.40
 

Yellow Seedless

0.35-0.65
75 Peppers  
 

Mixed

5.00
 

Green

3.00-10.00
 

Red

6.50-9.50
1194 Tomatoes  
 

Red

3.00-18.00
 

Pink

3.00-11.00
237 Sweet Corn Doz. 0.75-1.80
68 Cucumbers 3.00-9.00
313 Squash  
 

Yellow

3.00-9.50
 

Green

3.00-9.50
30 Potatoes  
 

Red

5.00-7.50
22 Eggplant 4.00-8.50
24 Pumpkins 0.50-2.10
36 Peaches 5.00-7.00
20 Nectarine 8.00
50 Beans 15.00

Attention Delaware Farmers

Irrigation Field DayManaging Irrigation for Crop Performance and Efficient Water Usage

Date: Wednesday, August 26, 1998

Place: T.G. Adams & Sons farm, Road 583, between Greenwood and Bridgeville, DE

Time: 9:00 A.M. to noon

Meal: A barbecue pork and chicken picnic lunch will be provided

All Delaware farmers interested in irrigation are invited to aftend a field day on managing irrigation for crop performance and efficient water usage. This field day, sponsored by the University of Delaware Cooperative Extension, will be held on Wednesday, August 26,1998 at T.G. Adams & Sons farm, Road 583, between Greenwood and Bridgeville, DE from 9:00 A.M. to noon. A picnic style lunch will be provided at noon. This meeting will focus on large overhead irrigation systems (pivots, guns, laterals) and best management practices for irrigation. Topics will include:

Water use and irrigation strategies for field crops and vegetable crops

Water quality concerns in irrigated crop production

Managing water application rates

Irrigation scheduling by the checkbook method, using tensiometers and resistance meters, and computer assisted scheduling.

Nutrient management in irrigated crops

Fertigation

Water conservation concerns

Irrigation management assistance

Talks and demonstrations will be presented by University of Delaware researchers, specialists, and agents. We will also have Paul Bodenstine an irrigation consultant with Ag Systems Consulting, Norfolk, VA to talk about his experiences with irrigation management.

Please register in advance (so we know how many meals to provide) by calling the Kent County Cooperative Extension Office at (302) 697-4000. Anyone that is interested is welcome to aftend. For additional information or special assistance in accessing this meeting contact Gordon Johnson at the above number.

Hope to see you there.

Gordon Johnson - Extension Ag Agent, Kent County

Carl Davis - Extension Ag Agent, New Castle County

Derby Walker - Extension Ag Agent, Sussex County


Weather Summary

Week of August 14 to August 20

Rainfall:
1.33 inches
Readings taken for the previous 24 hours at 8 a.m.
Air Temperature:
Highs Ranged from 90 F on August 18 to 72 F on August 19.
Lows Ranged from 72 F on August 17 to 52 F on August 20 .
Soil Temperature:
80 F average for the week.
(Soil temperature taken at a 2 inch depth, under sod)

Web Address for the U of D Research & Education Center:

http://www.rec.udel.edu


Compiled and Edited By:

Tracy Wootten

Extension Associate - Vegetable Crops


Cooperative Extension Education in Agriculture and home Economics, University of Delaware, Delaware State College and the United States Department of Agriculture cooperating, John C. Nye, Dean and Director. Distributed in furtherance of the Acts of Congress of May 8 and June 30, 1914. Is the policy of the Delaware Cooperative Extension System that no person shall be subjected to discrimination on the grounds of race, sex, disability, age or national origin.


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