Volume 7, Issue 24 September 10, 1999


Vegetables

Vegetable Diseases - Kate Everts, Extension Vegetable Pathologist, University of Delaware and University of Maryland; everts@udel.edu and Phil Shields University of Maryland; ps136@umail.umd.edu

 

MELCAST for Fungicide Application on Watermelons.

Do not use MELCAST if there is a disease outbreak in your field, it is a preventative program. Below are the EFI values from weather stations located on the Eastern Shore August 27 September 3. Any questions please call Phil Shields at (410) 742-8788 or e-mail: ps136@umail.umd.edu

 

EFI Values for 1999

Location

8/27

8/28

8/29

8/30

8/31

9/1

9/2

9/3

U of M, LESREC
Salisbury,MD

3

5

5

1

0

1

9

6

Wootten Farms, Galestown,MD

4

4

4

0

0

0

0

2

Mark Collins,
Laurel, DE

4

5

5

0

0

0

3

1

Vincent Farms Laurel, DE

3

4

4

0

0

1

9

0

D C Farms,
Bridgeville, DE

5

4

5

0

0

1

1

2

Balvin Brinsfield,
Vienna, MD

3

3

4

0

0

0

6

7

Charles Wright,
Mardela Springs, MD

2

5

5

0

0

0

2

1

U of D, REC Georgetown, DE

3

4

 

4

0

1

5

1

Watermelon Fields should be sprayed with a fungicide when 30 EFI values have been accumulated by the weather station nearest your fields. Add 2 points for every overhead irrigation. After a fungicide spray, reset your counter to 0 and start over. If a spray has NOT been applied in 14 days, apply a fungicide and reset the counter to zero. The first and last day above can be partial days so use the larger EFI value of this report and other reports for any specific day.

 


 

Laurel Farmer's Auction Market Report

September 2, 1999 September 8, 1999

 

Quantity

Produce

Price

5,442

Cantaloupes

 

 

Athena

0.25-1.45

 

Super Star

0.35-1.05

 

Starfire

0.35

2281

Sugar Babies

0.35-1.00

68

Honeydews

0.40

405,050

Watermelons

 

 

Crimson Sweet

 

 

15 up

0.50-1.75

 

20 up

0.60

 

Sangria

 

 

15 up

0.60-0.75

 

20 up

0.60-1.45

 

25 up

1.65-1.75

 

30 up

1.80

 

All Sweet

 

 

15 up

0.60-0.80

 

20 up

0.60-1.85

 

25 up

0.75-1.05

 

Royal Majesty

 

 

12 up

0.40-0.45

 

Seedless

0.50-1.45

30

Peppers

 

 

Green

4.00-7.50

 

Red

4.50-5.50

25

Eggplant

3.00-6.00

485

Tomatoes

 

 

Red

4.00-17.00

 

Pink

7.00-12.50

10

Cucumbers

2.00-9.50

63

Squash

 

 

Yellow

4.00-8.50

 

Green

3.00-6.00

29

Potatoes

 

 

Red

3.00-5.00

2

Okra

3.00

22

Lima Beans

3.00-18.00

20

Sweet Corn Doz.

1.75

26

Peaches

5.00

159

Sweet Potatoes

4.00-7.50

255

Gourds

0.65-5.50

677

Mexican Hats

0.50-1.00

446

Pumpkins

0.25-7.00

 


Field Crops

Recharging Legumes For Winter - Richard W. Taylor, Extension Agronomist ; rtaylor@udel.edu

 

One of the most important management decisions a grower makes is when to take the last late-summer/early-fall harvest on legumes such as alfalfa and red clover. Legumes need a 6- to 8-week rest period prior to the first killing frost in the fall to accumulate energy reserves for winter survival. A killing frost is not the only consideration either. As fall progresses, the number of hours of sunlight becomes smaller until the combination of short days and cool/cold temperatures shuts down the crop. Before the shutdown occurs, legumes must store enough sugars and carbohydrates to stay alive over the winter months.

 

Backing up from the average date of the first fall frost, the cut off date that we use is between Sept. 10 to Sept. 15. When possible, the last harvest is ideally taken in the last week of August or the first week of September to provide that little bit of cushion in case of an early killing frost. In a year such as this one when the drought has disrupted harvest schedules and made a necessity of a late-summer/early-fall harvest, observing the cutoff date is critically important.

 

Finally, the other management tool available for preparing the crop for the winter is the application of potassium, phosphorus, and boron following the August harvest. Apply the second spilt of fertilizer to legume crops following an early- to mid-August cut (first preference) or following the last harvest before the Sept. 10 to 15 cutoff date if the previous harvest was taken in July. Fall fertilization (after the Sept. 15 deadline for cutting) does not benefit the crop to any extent since the shorter days and cooler temperatures are slowing root growth and nutrient uptake.


 

Grain Marketing Highlights - Carl German, Extension Crops Marketing Specialist ; clgerman@udel.edu

 

Private Analyst Estimates Smaller US Corn and Soybean Crops.

A private analyst has added to the forecasts calling for smaller crops. The report released on September 7th, three days ahead of USDA's September crop report to be released September 10th, places US soybean production at 2.716 billion bushels and US corn at 9.272 billion bushels. The analyst estimates a US soybean yield of 37.1 bushels per acre and US corn yield at 130.7 billion bushels. The yield estimates compare to USDA's August estimates of 39.2 bushels per acre for soybeans and 134.7 bushels per acre for corn. The production estimates compare with USDA's August forecasts of 2.870 billion bushels for soybeans and 9.561 billion bushels for corn. The 5-year average US soybean crop is 2.503 billion bushels and 9.130 billion bushels for corn.

The 1998 U.S. harvest for soybeans was 2.757 billion bushels and 9.761 billion for corn. In 1998, US soybean yields were 38.9 bushels per acre (5-year average 38.4) and US corn yields were 134.4 (5-year average 128.1). Record high US soybean production occurred in 1994 with a yield of 41.4 bushels per acre. The record US corn yield was 138.6 bushels per acre.

These numbers are intended as a benchmark in which to receive USDA's September Crop report, to be released at 0730 CT (0830 ET) on September 10th. The weekly crop
conditions report, for the week ended September 3, declined slightly for US soybeans (the eight week in a row) and increased slightly for US corn. The technical charts, for soybeans in particular, are in a very positive position. Each weekly low has been higher, since about the last week of July.


Weather Summary

Week of September 1 to September 8

Rainfall:

0.05 inches: September 4

0.29 inches: September 5

0.73 inches: September 7

Readings taken for the previous 24 hours at 8 a.m.

Air Temperature:

Highs Ranged from 85F on September 6 & 8 to 73 F on September 1.

Lows Ranged from 75F on September 5 & 6 to 65F on September 1.

Soil Temperature:

76 F average for the week.

(Soil temperature taken at a 2 inch depth, under sod)

 

Web Address for the U of D Research & Education Center:

http://www.rec.udel.edu


Compiled and Edited By:

Tracy Wootten

Extension Associate - Vegetable Crops


Cooperative Extension Education in Agriculture and home Economics, University of Delaware, Delaware State College and the United States Department of Agriculture cooperating, John C. Nye, Dean and Director. Distributed in furtherance of the Acts of Congress of May 8 and June 30, 1914. Is the policy of the Delaware Cooperative Extension System that no person shall be subjected to discrimination on the grounds of race, sex, disability, age or national origin.


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